Home

Wall-E's World

Model Cars

Oddities

The 'E' Files

Contact Wall-E

      Your path: Home >> Wall-E's World >> Model Cars >> 1999 Shelby Series One
1999 Shelby Series One
Manufacturer: Maisto
Release dates: 2010(?)-Current
Catalog number: 31277
Date Purchased: 19-Mar-11
Date Completed 20-Apr-13
Number in collection: 220

The Shelby Series 1 was a high-performance, two-seat roadster produced by Shelby American, Inc. for the 1999 model year. It was the only car designed and engineered by Carroll Shelby from a clean sheet of paper, as opposed to other cars carrying his name that were modified versions of existing production vehicles. It was powered by an Oldsmobile Aurora 4.0 l (244 CI) four cam V8 engine that produced 320 horsepower, coupled to s six-speed manual transmission. This combination delivered a 0-60 mph (0-96 km/h) time of 4.4 seconds and a top speed of 170 mph (273.5 km/h). An optional supercharger improved these times even more.

A total of 249 Series 1 cars were produced for 1999, the only official model year. The cost of certification for the 2000 model year, so cars made from the remaining parts stock were sold through 2005 as 'component cars', and delivered without an engine and transmission installed,

This replica is made by Maisto, as part of their Special Edition series. Like all other cars in this series, it features a die-cast body with opening doors and hood. All other parts are plastic. This one differs by having a separate engine, transmission, and related drive train and suspension components. These added details are better than other cars I have in this series, and rivals some plastic kits. The interior has nice detailing, and an open car such as this helps to show it off. The body is also very good, with several plated and clear parts for details. Although fully assembled, this car is fairly easy to disassemble to make painting easier.

I originally worked on this car long before I started photographing them. The 'before' pictures are not of my car, but ones I found online of cars that are in original condition, in a different color. The 'after' pictures are of my car, but taken while I was originally writing this page.

Click to zoom Click to zoom
What I started with. Actual car I used for reference.


Pictures of car before any changes were made (click to enlarge)

Disassembly was started by removing two screws that hold the chassis to the body. Unless I state otherwise, many parts are mounted to other parts by pins which are attached by heat applied from the inside of the part they are mounted to. I cut these bonds and removed the parts. The remainder of this process, as well as the resulting parts breakdown, is as follows:
  • A black plastic piece on the top of the engine that covers the intake manifold. This was carefully removed by prying it from the top of the engine with a hobby knife blade.
  • A silver plastic piece on the top of the chassis that contains a support for the front springs and some upper chassis detail. This was carefully removed by prying it from the top of the chassis with a hobby knife blade.
  • A black plastic piece which has detail for both front springs. This is attached by two pins to the support mentioned in the previous step. I was able to remove it by applying gentle pressure to the mounting pins.
  • An assembly containing the complete interior and upper suspension supports. This took some effort to figure out how it was connected to the rest of the chassis. It turned out to be the tip of the steering column, which snaps into a hole in the chassis bottom, near the left front lower control arm.
  • A black plastic shift lever that is press-fit into the dashboard.
  • A two-piece grey plastic dashboard, that snaps to the front of the interior, and is held together by pins behind the gauge panel.
  • A black steering wheel and column that snaps to the half of the dashboard assembly that also contains gauges and other controls that are represented by decals.
  • A grey plastic armrest, that has a pin underneath it that locates to a hole in the interior floor, between the seats.
  • A three-piece front seat assembly, consisting of a black plastic piece containing both backs and bottoms, and two gray plastic pattern inserts (one for each side).
  • A black plastic pedal assembly that is press-fit into the floor.
  • A grey plastic piece that includes the interior floor, front and rear upper suspension, and some frame detail. It that locates to the front wheel spindles and rear lower control arms.
  • A multi-piece engine, transaxle, and rear axle assembly. This was removed by carefully prying the exhaust manifolds from the engine, the bottom of the engine from pins moulded into the chassis, then lifting the entire assembly from pins in the rear lower control arms.
  • Two chrome-plated plastic valve covers, a plated intake manifold, and a black belt and pulley assembly that were removed from the engine by carefully prying them from the engine with a hobby knife blade.
  • The remainder of the engine and transaxle assembly, which is plated, includes the rear wheels and tires. The wheels are chrome plated plastic, and the tires are soft vinyl, with good tread but no sidewall detail. I saw no way to remove the wheels from the axles without damaging either or both, so I stopped there.
  • A flexible vinyl tie rod, with the front wheels attached to it by plastic pins. The wheel spindles fit loosely to the same pins moulded into the chassis that are used to hold the interior assembly in place. The wheels are chrome plated plastic, and the tires are soft vinyl, with good tread bit no sidewall detail. I saw no way to remove the wheels from the tie rod without damaging either or both, so I stopped there.
  • A gray plastic exhaust system. The mufflers snap to the rear of the chassis. This piece can then be removed carefully sqeezing the mufflers together and feeding them through a hole in front of the rear axle.
  • A black plastic chassis, with details of the lower parts of the front and rear suspension. All four control arms have pins moulded into them that are used to hold previously mentioned parts.
  • A black plastic single piece engine compartment insert, which snaps to the inside of the body.
  • A clear windshield that snaps to the inside of the windshield frame. This also holds a black plastic windshield header and rear view mirror in place.
  • Like some other cars in this series, I couldn't determine a way to remove the doors without damaging the doors or the hinge mechanism. I was able to remove the gray plastic inner door panels, which nicely engraved detail and press-fit onto pins cast into the inside of the doors. The side view mirrors are cast as part of the doors, with mirror glass represented by self-stick foil.
  • Two clear plastic headlight lenses and two clear fog light lenses, which are attached by heat applied from the inside of the body to moulded-in pins on the parts. I cut these bonds and removed the parts.
  • Two plated plastic headlights and a plated gas gap, which are attached by heat applied from the inside of the body to moulded-in pins on the parts. I cut the bonds to remove the parts.
  • A three-piece rear light assembly. The two tail lights are clear red, and have a pin that holds them in place on a single clear orange strip that also contains turn signal detail. The strip fits to inside of the body.
  • The die-cast body, painted metallic blue with printed stripes, emblems, and a self-stick rear number plate. It features opening hood and doors attached to the body in a way that would probably make it difficult to remove without damaging the panels and/or body.

After disassembling the car, only paint and foil were used to add details.

The following is a summary of the changes I made:
  • Wheels and tires: Sanded the tread surface with 220 grit sandpaper to simulate wear. Painted brake rotor detail inside wheels Tamiya metallic gray.
  • Engine and transaxle: Stripped all plated parts with oven cleaner. Painted engine block, heads, intake manifold, front cover and transaxle Tamiya aluminum. Painted accessory belt Testors acrylic flat black. Engine top cover, drive pulleys, and rear axle drive shafts are Tamiya semi-gloss black. Oil filter is Testors orange.
  • Engine compartment: Painted piece containing base of windshield and inner fenderwells Testors acrylic flat black. Details were highlighted with Tamiya aluminum. This was also used on piece containing upper sub-frame detail. Front shocks were painted with Testors gold and Testors acrylic flat black. Remainder of engine compartment details were painted using pictures of the actual car as a guide.
  • Chassis: sanded away moulded-in lettering that listed the description of the car, the model company name, and their logo. Filled two small screw holes that hold car in place inside packaging with epoxy putty. Painted majority of the piece Testors spray silver. Areas that weren't easily covered by spray were painted with Tamiya aluminum. Areas closest to the front and rear bumpers were painted Testors acrylic flat black. Exhaust system is Tamiya metallic gray with Bare-Metal foil used to detail the exhaust tips.
  • Interior: Painted interior floor, door panels, and seat inserts a mix of Testors acrylic black and white. A slightly darker shade of this mix was used on the dashboard, console, and center arm rest. Seats, steering wheel and column, pedals, and shift lever are Testors acrylic flat black. Applied Testors acrylic semi-gloss clear to all interior surfaces except floor. Remaining interior details were highlighted with appropriate colors, using pictures of the actual car as a guide. The bottom of the interior also includes some suspension and chassis details, which were painted Tamiya aluminum.
  • Windshield: No change was made to this part.
  • Body: Painted complete underside of body, including the hood, Testors acrylic flat black. Applied Bare-Metal foil to front turn signals, rear side marker lights, rear center-mounted brake light, and inside of rear light assembly. Painted tail lights, front and rear turn signals, backup lights with Tamiya clear red, clear orange, and Testors flat white. Drew in body panel seam with a metal tipped 'quill' pen and black ink. Remaining exterior details were highlighted with appropriate colors, using pictures of the actual car as a guide.
Detailed parts, before assembly To the left is the car prior to assembly.

The car was reassembled by reversing the procedure used to disassemble it. No glue was needed.


Pictures of completed car (click to enlarge)


The proportions of the completed car look very close to the actual car. The table below shows how close they are.

Actual car 
(mm / in)
Model
(mm / in)
Dimensions of actual car based on model scale
(mm / in)
Calculated scale based on model to actual car
Length 4293 / 169.0 181.5 / 7.15 4356 / 171.5 1:24
Wheelbase 2443 / 96.2 101.1 / 3.98 2426 / 95.6 1:24
Width 1943 / 76.5 80.9 / 3.18 1942 / 76.4 1:24
Height 1194 / 47.0 49.8 / 1.96 1195 / 47.1 1:24

According to my calculations, this car is probably as close as you can get to its advertised 1:24 scale.

I was happy enough with my original effort that I made no changes from when I originally worked on this car. I just disassembled it once more and gave it a thorough cleaning before I took the pictures that you see here.

I'm not sure when this car was originally released, nor do I know if it's currently in production. It's been quite some time since I have seen it in any stores. As I mentioned earlier, this the most detailed Maisto as part of their Special Edition car currently in my collection. Although I have seen a plastic model kit of the Shelby Series 1, I will probably never buy it, as this replica is nice enough. I only wish Maisto would put the same effort into their other cars.


Liked what you saw? More cars can be found HERE .

Home       Wall-E's World       Model Cars       Oddities       The 'E' Files       Contact Wall-E